Saturday, July 12, 2014

Summer Blazer Jacket - Vogue 2853 - completed

Third time is the charm for this pattern which qualifies for my pattern repeat summer series. Lots of those in the pipeline (or completed) but finally here is the finished seersucker jacket.

Seersucker jacket on me1

The first post in this series is here, so if you want to see the start and one of the other versions I have made, which was a winter plaid wool. I just realized that I forgot to mention I squared off the corners of the lapels on this version, the original pattern has a rounded lapel and collar. I like the square and there will probably be another version next year. I think I need a casual corduroy version, maybe in a wine color?
Here is a better look at the finished jacket, which doesn't look all rumply in real life, well maybe it does because that is how things actually look when worn, right?

Seersucker jacket lapels

This jacket has a dart under the lapel, in fact it has two darts in the front that are a bit unusual, the one under the lapel and the vertical dart that finished in the welt pocket. They give the jacket a really nice shaping and fit, at least for me. 
Seersucker jacket lapel

OK maybe this is way too many pictures but after all those construction posts why not?
The lining is a very lightweight cotton that has a slight seersucker texture - kind of perfect. I am sure I bought it at an estate sale or something like that so cost was minimal. Ordinarily I like a slippery lining but not for a summer jacket which I am wearing over a t-shirt or something sleeveless.

Seersucker jacket inside
Here is the back view, which is very plain, no vent. What is with my dress form? Everything looks terrible from the back. Its shoulders are not my shoulders, that's for sure. Now that I see the pattern photo I remember that I squared off the center front bottom hem as well. Looks crisper with the seersucker I think.

V2853AK suitSeersucker jacket back view

Ok action shot, i.e. buttoning the jacket. Which I will never wear that way.

seersucker jacket buttoning

With one $ 4.00 shell button from Stone Mountain. Also the seersucker is from Stone Mountain, very nice quality. 


Seersucker jacket button

Seeing these photos I think it does look good with the sleeves pushed up, will have to remember that. Jeez in this picture I look like I am about to reach out and shake your hand. Welcome to Consolidated Amalgamated Business Industries, we are happy to serve you! Blech!  Not the casual summertime look I was going for. Slim ankle length pants are called for, like yesterday !

seersucker jacket closeup

Anyway - if you are interested in seeing how I got here, the first post in this jacket series is here.
The Flickr set is here if you want to see all the photos but I am lazy and never put any captions or details there. 

So many other things to show you since I started this jacket series! All kinds of pattern repeats. And lots of fabric sewn from the stack that was threatening to overtake the bed in the guest bedroom (that is where I let all fabric purchases marinate, they are spread out over the bed so I can pop in there and cast an eye for inspiration or desperation).

Happy weekend sewing, Beth

Today's SunnyGal garden photo which is getting perilously close to being the last for a while. We are under drought rules now and supposed to water at a minimum level. So the lawns will go and I will save my water portion for the hydrangeas, roses, tomatoes etc. 
Should have put in more drought tolerant things, or so I say every summer. Here is a lovely drought tolerant salvia with some tomatoes peeking out from behind.


purple salvia

36 comments:

  1. Your jacket is so beautifully finished off, and looks very formal! I had never thought of seersucker as capable of that before! Your work is immaculate :)

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  2. It's just lovely. Thanks so much for the series of jacket posts, I've really enjoyed reading them and picked up a couple of good tips!
    I like the idea of a casual summer jacket, especially with the cotton lining, looks so cool and effortless!

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  3. Fantastic outcome and what perfect pockets! The fit is so good and the sleeves...even with seersucker...how wonderful! That single button just compliments the whole look and using a similar lining...aren't surprise finds just so cool? Keep watering your tomatoes...use the water that you hard boil eggs in as it contains calcium and can be used by that plant.

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    1. Love a seersucker jacket, and yours is impeccable! Must remember Mrs. Mole's tip for using water from boiling eggs to water tomatoes.

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    2. I use my egg water for plants, but it was just because it's water & I don't want to waste it. It never occurred to me that it has a trace of calcium! Brilly!

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  4. That jacket is really lovely. I love the sharpness of the edges and the really great pockets. I'm loving the details posts and will use the tips for a jacket I want to make (soon I hope).

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  5. Fabulous jacket, as always. You've inspired me to pull my jacket WIP out of hiding. Maybe I can be brave enough to finish it if I go step by step with your posts as a guide! :)

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  6. WOW, I am impressed, it is very professional and RTW but of course better fitting than RTW.
    I need to read your series--how did you press the seams of the seersucker without the pressing taking away the seersucker-ness (without it flattening out the seersucker)???

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  7. It's really fantastic! The seersucker screams summer but it is still very pulled together and of course, excellently executed.

    Love your series posts!

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  8. Your jacket is really well done. Maybe once the heat eases up I can get myself to consider sewing jackets again. Someone once told me that pushing up your jacket sleeves takes off 10 lbs. I don't think I have worn one down since. I use the wrapped ponytail rubber bands to hold them up.

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  9. The jacket is just awesome! Thanks for documenting the entire process and giving us a wonderful series of posts to refer back to. And I think a wine corduroy one for fall would be amazing.

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  10. Truly beautiful work, Beth! The fit is spot on--looks great on you!

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  11. Lovely! Honestly, I don't think there is a fabric available that you can't turn into a work of art. :) Impeccable work.

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  12. Such a lovely jacket! It will really look good with slim pants! I was just wondering how your garden is faring in this drought. We don't have restrictions, yet anyway, but no one waters their lawns in Daly City anyway :)

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  13. Nice job!
    Thanks for the series.

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  14. Terrific! I've enjoyed following the series...thanks for going to the trouble to photograph and post as you went!

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  15. Fabulous! Thanks for sharing all these posts.

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  16. Immaculate work Beth, beautiful finish and such a classic piece. Fab!

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  17. Perfection! You do such beautiful work.

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  18. Gorgeous jacket, Beth. You have amazing skills.

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  19. A perfectly tailored jacket, Beth!

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  20. Lovely! I'm trying to convince my mister that seersucker will be great fir a summer shirt but he's not sold yet.

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  21. Perfect blazer. How generous of you to share your knowledge. Thanks so much.

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  22. I'm with Carolyn - even though I've been following your construction posts carefully, I would never have thought seersucker to be able to do this! It's gorgeous, Beth - and looks wonderful on :)

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  23. Take that victory lap- you earned it and educated us all. Thank you!

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  24. Well done, Beth! The jacket is beautiful - so well sewn! I'm very impressed. This could go easily from corporate world to a beach trip. I have a feeling you'll be wearing it often :)

    Thanks for sharing all the details of your sewing journey! Love the result :)

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  25. You're too funny..."belch"! I love the jacket, it's gorgeous and I think every woman should have one like this in her arsenal for summer! Great job!

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  26. Beautiful workmanship as always, Beth!

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  27. Happy to serve you, LOL. You remind me of a funny story... Many years ago, per my family's request, I went to a professional photographer after I completed my PhD to have a few poses in cap and gown, plus a few without. I wore a blazer ('cuz that looks profesional, right?) for the non-gown poses. Although the photos came out nicely, my sister joked that the blazer photos made me look like a Realtor - and by gum, she was totally right.

    I love seersucker, it's such a fun fabric. Great job on your new blazer!

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  28. Wonderful! The jacket is beautifully made. I'd love to have one or two. ;-)

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  29. Wow! This is so crisp and gorgeous! Perfect for summer!

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  30. Such a perfect finish! I lust after your fit & technique precision! (and I do notice that matching lining.....) ;-)

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  31. Your jacket looks impeccable, thank you for sharing all the construction along the way, it will be useful to go back to next time I make a blazer.

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  32. I am so happy to have found your blog. I am working my way through all your jacket construction posts. Your work is just beautiful and the techniques are just so well executed. Something for me to aspire to that is for sure.

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  33. Your jacket is lovely, I have a seersucker jacket in my summer wardrobe that I wear to death. Mine is unlined but the look is the same crisp, but cool.

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